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until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to latino kids and african americans and that they were showing up in school way behind their peers as a result because as you mentioned maybe the education system failed them. then doing very poorly, higher drop out rates, all that sort of thing. what do you think about the position that have article? >> i read the article i thought it was garbage, i think there were a lot of assumptions made that just don't match reality. i mean, i attended university and i think affirmative action enabled me to fully integrate in to the full pro
of the issues in the report, early childhood education. as senator dodd said come we've made great progress. the home visitation program for new and expecting moms that live in high-risk communities. the race to the top an income of $500 billion in 2011 and an additional $133 million for the top five runner-up states in 2012. but the facts remain, even though that is good news, less than 5% of the kids eligible for early head start by getting early head start services in this country today. depending on your number, but in our report we showed that less than 30% of the kids eligible for head start by getting services today. there's no question the quality needs to go up in both of those. save the children is now running head start programs in arkansas and soon in louisiana to improve the quality of services delivered by those programs. we need to do a better job in making sure child care dollars are spent more efficiently and effectively having an impact on cancer at the bottom under means we should not talk about whether to get those programs, but making additional investment to make more
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
old girl was shot in the head for defying the taliban by arguing to help girls get an education. >> porter: what are we doing with american forces being put at risk fighting the taliban more than 11 years after 9/11? part of the answer may be to help girls like malalla usavsi, whose crime was wanting to go to school. >> reporter: she is the girl in stretcher, shot after members of the taliban stopped her van on the way back from school and shot bullets in her head and neck. her crime, saying things like that? "i have the right. i have the right to education. i have the right to sing. i have the right to talk. i have the right to speak.." >> she spoke at 11. she had an anonymous blog written by the bbc after the taliban bombed schools in her town to try to prevent girls from getting an education. she knew it was dangerous, when asked what she would tell other girls that are afraid to defy the taliban and stay in their rooms instead. >> i tell her don't stay in your room because god will ask you on the day of judgment, where were you when your people were asking you, when your sch
the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
either because they are frustrated or because they want to get more training or education. some people are finding jobs. economists have looked at different calculations of which is the better factor -- the bigger factor, or people dropping out or getting more education and training and my understanding is that there are equal roles being played by each for spirit -- each force. but there are definitely some dropping out. some of that is the baby boom generation starting to retire. it may not be a "dropping out," but people choosing to retire and leave their jobs. some older people may have lost their jobs and cannot find new ones and are taking early social security benefits. there is some of that. host: mr. r doane, the labor force participation -- mr. nardone, a labor force position rick, please explain this. guest: the take the people who are employed in those who are unemployed and combine them and you get what is called the labour force. divide that by the population in at 16 and over and you're of the force participation rate. is the proportion of the population that is either e
economic security, education and child health. and provide policy recommendations to improve the outcomes in these areas. following the release of the state of american child report, senator dodd and senator bob casey called on first focus and translates great patriotic report card to provide a holistic picture of children's unmet needs in america and policy suggestion on how to meet those needs. so one of the things when we think about this report is we -- i have four kids and i went back to school night, in the past few weeks and i figured out that my kids it created about 300 times a year, with its tests, quizzes, homework assignments, plus all the testing that are required by national policy. so, you know, no child left behind, et cetera. so 300 times we assess kids to you. so what we thought about it was how about how we all as a nation are doing on kids. so what's our report on how we are faring for kids? so this is a chance to turn that around and great ourselves. copies of the report are available, as you all know and also on our website. our grades are not accessing a particular
to succeed and i want our school to be giving our kids the kind of education they need for the jobs of tomorrow. that means we have to put our kids first and parents first and teachers first. the teachers union will have to go behind. [cheers and applause] number 4, you will not get business people to risk their life savings to start a small business or big companies to come to america, built a big factory, hire americans if they think we are on the road to greece. if we keep spending more than we taken, that is where we're heading. we will cap federal spending and get us back on track to a balanced budget. [cheers and applause] number 5, number 5 is this -- we are going to champion small business. we're going to help small business people build their businesses. to do that, we will keep their taxes down and get regulations to encourage growth and take that big cloud of obama care of small business. we're going to help small business in america. [cheers and applause] we do those five things and 12 million jobs grow in america and take home pay starts going up again. do you realize u
cut down talks completely on jobs and wanting to cut the education credit. the president signed the "dream act," and hundreds of thousands of students are able to get their education. i am educated. i put my son through law school. it is his birthday today on columbus day, october 8. we moved to california when i was 8 years old. my mother remarried and my stepfather was a marine at camp pendleton and coronado. host: thank you for the call. guest: everything she said, i disagree with. she did talk about lowering the cost of education for kids getting into college. that is significant. she also talked about the blue part of the state that has really struggled. over the last 30 or 35 years. it's now starting to come back with a gas and oil industry, making sure that it is safe, with the steel industry, it's starting to come back. and certainly with the automotive industry. we have to be positive about those kind of things. if we continuously be rated president and start saying government is not working, voters react to that. jay and i know that go to washington or columbus, they d
in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action. the scene outside the supreme court building made clear just how anticipated this case has been. for the first time in nearly a decade, the justices are considering whether it's constitutional for universities to use race in deciding who they admit. the suit was brought by abigail fisher-- a white, honor ro
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immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scholarships, they got wired. when you know this and you do not talk about it and do not do anything about it, this is another recipe for disaster. our public education system is just really got to be strained out. the teachers' unions are primarily concerned about how much they make a year, and that is not where the concern has to be. it is making sure that children have the funds in education that are needed for education. >> we spend double per person to educate k through 12, double other nations. we do the same thi
, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. this is actually about jobs and economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming
diverse campus provides a better education. that was the court's holding. after the argument today it seems clear the court is not going to go and overrule that precedent but the problem many of the justices had is how do you know when you have enough diversity. the university of texas has an unusual system. it automatically admits anybody who graduates in the top 10% academically of any high school in texas. that gets a fair amount of diversity on campus because many of those schools tend to be racially more uniform, predominantly black or hispanic and tend to get diversity. the problem for perhaps the majority of the justices how do you know when there's enough diversity. what the school says is, we don't want merely diversity in numbers. we want african-american students who are interested in fencing and speaking greek and studying architecture and hispanic students who are great fencers or ballet dancers. we want diversity in other words within the mere racial numbers. and i think for a majority of the court the question is how do you know when you're there, how do you know whe
of talking about our educational system, instead of talking about educational and pell grants. >> incarceration rates. >> all the opportunity ladders, all of these barriers, racial discrimination employment. there's a whole lot of things they could have talked about instead and i think it's really important is that we not fall for it. that african merges have to say this is not it it. i'm sorry. we're better than that. we're capable of having professional jobs, all kinds of jobs. this is a very, very, very detrimental ad. >> can i talk about this for a second? when we look at the history of the 20th century, history of labor in the 20th century, one of the great triumphs of the civil rights era was for people to recognize -- for white labor to recognize that as long as black laborers were excluded from unions they were undercutting white labor as well. >> it took a while. >> it did. it took 60 years actually. so when you see this kind of cynical advertising, they're trying to use that same ploy using african-americans. and if we had any doubt about the inter-related struggles,
heard fissured the university of texas at austin, the affirmative action policies in higher education. abigail fisher was denied admission to the university of texas at austin in 2008. fischer sued, arguing that racial minorities with worse credentials were accepted ahead of her because she was white. she contend that the schools use of of race in nations violates the u.s. constitution's guarantee of equal protection. a previous court ruling allows race to be one factor considered to achieve diversity. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> well, i get to say that this is case of love and 345, fisher of the of texas at austin. and you get to say -- >> general suter trained me too well. chief justice and members of the court, may i please the court. the essential issue here is whether the university of texas at austin and can carry its burden of proving that its use of race as an nation plus factor and the consequent denial of equal treatment, which is the central mandate of equal protection clause to abigail fisher met the two test of strict scrutiny, which are applicable. >> before we ge
into this country at 16. $10 in my pocket when i arrived at new york city. of course, no education. the hardest thing i ever had to do. >> reporter: this act gives no freebies. to get to the ballot, prerequisites tacked on. paid tax, registered for selective service, plan to apply for full citizenship. supporters of the act say they want equal footing for all college bound in the community. the dreamers, the investment made in early education. >> we need them to build and assist in making a better america. in building of our future. >> some people that have been here for a really long time, and that's like, like a sister or brother, not being able to go to college. >> reporter: after the rally in langley park, time to strike up the band and march to the university of maryland campus. the senior director torres says the efforts lay preparation for larger immigration reform. >> we truly believe that the sooner the president is going to be re-elected, president obama, the first priority in 2013. >> reporter: a long march from langley park to college park with long uphill stretches but they all mad
to her home university because of her her. defend. >> we believe the educational benefits of diversity are so important they're worth fighting for all the way to the supreme court. >> most americans would like a day when we don't need to take race and ethnicity into account in admissions. we are not to that day. >> eliot: joining me now is the president of the national urban league and former mayor of new orleans, thank you mayor for joining me. >> i appreciate it. >> eliot: let me start with what is the hardest question, why do we still need affirmative action in higher education? >> well, there are two important reasons. one is what the consideration does it get to, a diverse student body. a diverse student body at institutions of higher education is where leaders and citizens of tomorrow who will operate in a more diverse world are being trained. the benefits of diversity in the student body in the student body as a role is apparent. secondly education is so basic to one's success that what we have to do is understand that many people still face crushing poverty. many barriers, disc
educational programs and pell grants. they can cut those without consequences. more and more with the younger generation, they're digital. we need online registration. >> well said, by the way, in the state of california, many state legislators were saying that the reason they cut higher education for the uc system first is they figured there was the least amount of political consequence for them in doing so because young people don't vote. the case that we're making to people is not just vote because of the historical importance or because of the necessity as american citizens, but money equates to vote because they allocate money and resources on the basis of how groups turn out and that's critical. >> if they think they can cut you without consequence, they will. >> they will. >> part of the sin nichl here, too, is the youth vote was a critical vote in the 2008 elections. to this point of who is most impacted, both the people who have been getting much, much more engaged in our electoral process. these are first -- many times they're first-time voters. and what we're doing is essentially s
that the narrow focus on racial diversity in higher education has eclipsed larger issues of class and the quality, among colleges and universities. so, in advance of the u.s. supreme court's oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas, which will take place next week, the century foundation put together a report which i am going to outline which looks at the question, is it possible to create racial and ethnic diversity without using race, and instead paying attention to larger issues of economic equality in our society. it is called a better affirmative action. it makes three main points. the first, that racial affirmative action is likely on its way out. affirmative action based on race was always meant to be temporary by those who originally envisioned it, a deviation for a period of time away from the non-discrimination principle. but now there are both legal and political forces that appear to be bringing affirmative action to a end. to begin with, it is highly unpopular among average american voters. if you look at the supreme court briefs in the fisher case, you would think there i
the educational experience of all pupils. >> caller: that's good. i guess it goes back to the case the was deemed moot anyway, but the fact of the matter is when you are laying on that table and you are about to have brain surgery, it doesn't matter what color the surgeon is. i don't care if he is black, white, it doesn't make any difference. the fact of the matter is if they were granted admission to school simply based on the fact of their skin color, that in itself is discriminatory. >> host: okay. carroll. oklahoma city. independent. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i would say that i hope [inaudible] they don't intervene because that affirmative action of white women versus african-american women for jobs and positions and i think it is being used in that respect. hopefully the supreme court will step down and allow it to continue as it is. >> host: okay. new hampshire. the democratic call. good morning, now three. what are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among
of doctors, farm subsidies, education loans for middle class students, certainly not defense. >> many of the states are in the same boat, facing huge deficits with few prospects for cutting, which is why washington state is joining the movement across the country to tax the rich. >> hey, everybody. >> voters will decide on initiative 1098 that would create an income tax but only on the wealthy, of whom there are many: 133,000 millionaires and 7 billionaires, including bill gates of microsoft. >> thank you. >> his father, bill gates, sr., has poured his own money into backing initiative 1098. >> some people say initiative 1098 is about soaking the rich. >> the tax would bring in $3 billion a year to be spent mainly on education, which has suffered cutbacks as the state reels under a massive deficit. >> vote yes on 1098. it's good for washington. >> washington is one of only seven states without any income tax. the proposal would create a 5% rate on income over $200,000 for individuals and $400,000 for couples. a 9% rate kicks in at $1/2 million on individuals and $1 million for couples
, not for most people, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. mr. brown? >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, tha
in the book. she was very learned and very proud of her education at the university of wisconsin. does his father and his mother were wisconsin or is. they really hadn't traveled far at all and they were very, very middle-class folks in the depression and the father is a paper salesman. he had gotten through high school and he actually lost the family house. he was the breadwinner and a 1939 his house was sold at auction in wisconsin in this bucolic leafy suburb of milwaukee. it was sold for the debt that was on it which was $7000 of the family had been through some very dire straits. they were also very conservative. they were america firsters which meant they did not want america to be in world war ii. they were against the new deal and franklin roosevelt. they were very very conservative household. where that conservatism came on the parents part who knows except that it was pretty common i think when i was doing my research, pretty common, commonly found in that particular suburb at that time, the folks that i interviewed told me. when rehnquist was going into the army, just to jump up
on banks and insurance companies. we cannot got our investments on education, clean energy, research, technology. that is not a plan to grow the economy. that is not change. we have been there. we have tried that. we are not going back. we are moving forward. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] look -- we have got a different view about how you bring jobs and prosperity to america. the strong economy does not trickle down from the top. it grows from a thriving middle- class, and folks working hard to get into the middle-class. i think it is time our tax code stopped rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas. let us reward small businesses and manufacturing here in ohio, products made in america. that is the choice in this election. i believe we can create more jobs by controlling more of our own energy. after 30 years of inaction, we raised fuel standards. by the middle of the next decade, your cars and trucks would go twice as far on a gallon of gas. today, the u.s. is less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in two decade
that is essential for providing an educational experience for all of our students to prepare them for the world they're going out to work in. >> reporter: journalism student cheyenne matthews-hoffman was admitted through that process. >> u.t. at the moment has, like, 4.5% african american students with race considered. that's a really small portion of students here. and it is kind of alienating when you don't have a lot of students on campus that look like you. >> reporter: students have differing views. angus mcleod is a senior. >> when you're taking a class on black literature and there's not a single black student in the class it -- it can be kind of a depressing experience. you lose an interpretation and a view on what you're reading, what you're studying that would be really helpful otherwise. >> reporter: senior kaitlin williams. >> it would crush me to know that i have the same qualifications as someone and i'm not getting into graduate school because of my skin color. >> reporter: 27 years after heman sweatt's case went to court, his great nephew graduated from u.t . >> hopefully one day it
, jobs, education, and the federal budget deficit. on each one of the issues, i have more experience and then the governor of massachusetts. the national security and arms control, you have to understand the relationship between a ballistic missile, a warhead, what megatonnage is. the better understand about a correction. the better understand you have to negotiate from a position of strength. these are important issues because we want to have more arms control and arms deduction. i wrote the job training partnership act, a bipartisan bill to read a bill that is trained and employed over three disadvantaged youths and adults of enter this country. i have worked 80 years on the senate budget committee. i wish that the congress would give us a line item veto to help deal with that. qualifications a lot are going to be the issue in this campaign, george bush has more qualifications that george bush and michael dukakis combined. [applause] >> 11 interrupt and ask once again that the audience please keep your responses as quiet as possible. we know many of these are simply one -- for simp
and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking and national review among other journals. he's a senior fellow at the claire monththe mission to e ree the principles of the american found ming is the intellectual muscle of the i guess -- mission pings. he teaches in the key fellow programs. the fellows program and the lincoln fellows program. most important he's the editor of the clermont review books. a public cage of the clermont substitute. i encourage you to sib croi
initiatives for education on the november ballot. one of them just tipped to the negative. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee with the numbers. >> reporter: allen, let's start with what propositions 30 and 38 have in common. they both raise billions of dollars for education through taxes but where that money goes is a source of contention between the two camps. and it is starting to get a little nasty in the tv ad war. >> let's see how two measures measure up. >> reporter: yes on proposition 38 takes on its competing initiative head on in a new campaign ad. >> prop 30 spends money here but lets the politicians take it out here. that's why sacramento is behind it. >> reporter: those who support prop 30 including governor brown are not happy about this new ad. >> they have gone absolutely negative. it's an attack ad against prop 30. >> reporter: 38 supporters say it's not an attack ad saying, we reject that characterization. our new ad is similar in tone and theme to all our other ads. >> prop 30 stops the cuts. >> reporter: reportedly, the governor has pushed for a positive campaign at leas
the numbers say more about education and training than about race. he says less skilled less educated workers are doing poorly no matter what race they are are from. in washington, molly henneberg, fox news. >>> the problem we he have here is we have the democrats bragging about scoring field goals when we need touchdowns. >> they were rooting for a fumble and t is unbelievable that they are disappointd that we have a 44 month low in the unemployment rate. >> shannon: sunday football talk. not the kind that we are expecting here because now just 30 days left for president obama and governor romney to make their cases to voters before election day. it has been almost a week and both sides are still trying to clarify things that were said at last week's debate and tweak some strategy as they move on to the next one. i'm shannon bream. hour number two of america's news headquarters live from the nation's capital starts right now. >>> we begin with news on the unemployment rate. down to the lowest number since president obama took office. his campaign says that proves the president's policies are
for their college education and she's voted to increase taxes on the middle class through the ryan plan. all of this in order to keep tax breaks for multi-millionaires and tax breaks and subsidies for corporations who ship jobs overseas. we're going to reduce the deficits by bringing home our troops from afghanistan, by making sure that we create jobs right here in the district, by making sure that we decrease taxes on the middle class and small businesses, and by allowing medicare to negotiate drug prices with our pharmaceutical companies so that we can tackle the real problem, which is our health care costs and eliminate unnecessary procedures and redundant tests. >> all right, thank you, dr. ruiz. congresswoman, you have one minute. >> i don't think he understood the question, because what he just said, he's going to reduce the debt by not having so many medical tests, which, by the way, is a major part of obama care. obama care is what cut medicare by $716 billion on. let me tell you a few specific things i would do immediately to cut the debt. first of all, i would repeal obama care as
really good academic education but they've also really gotten spectacular education in living with the folks who are the real virginia today. we're increasingly diverse state and that's an important part of medication. -- education. i would hope what the supreme court would do in this case would be they would affirm that it is ok for a public institution, whether it's government body handing out contracts or student or college admitting students, that it's ok for them to try to make sure that their student body looks like the state looks. they should if at all practical use factors on race and economic disadvantage, are you the first in your family to go to college? but if you see public institutions where the numbers of students dramatically different then the state population, i think it's an indication of challenge and problem that we have to try to solve. i strongly believe the diversity of our commonwealth is the strength, diversity of our nation is a strength and we ought to see diversity in our public bodies. >> mr. allen? >> i'm in some agreement with tim's expressions
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> 5% of those currently serving in the u.s. congress are latino. despite the u.s. population. 2.5% in congress are asian or pacific islander. even though they make up 5% of the nation's population. those disparities could all change come november 6th. a report to be issued tomorrow at a new american leaders project examines how demographics and redistricting have created a record number of opportunities for immigrant communities to gain political office. this chart shows the breakdown of first and second generation candidates running for congress by their ethnicity. now, note that almost 70% of candidates represented here are latino with polls showing the majority of them expected to win their races. asian americans could see changes too. for example, new york state could be poised for its first asian american to congress. that person with me now. assembly woman grace payne is running in the new york's 6th congressional di
because they recognize that the path of education has to be open to every society, and we need to have kids learning from each other in the classroom, on the campus, on the fields of competition and everywhere. >> and so mr. taylor, what's the matter with that argument? how is it that your interpretation and those who are going to be arguing on the same side that you are is that affirmative action is actually serving as a crutch and that it hurts the very people that it is designed to serve and help? >> well, let me begin by saying i agree with mr. adigbuleh that a racial adversity and especially intellectual diversity is a good thing to have. the question is how far you're going to compromise other values, such as merit selection and the well-being of the individual students to accomplish that. by using very large racial preferences, much larger than most people realize in terms of the academic gaps between entering students who are black or hispanic or white or asian, there is kind of a hierarchy with asians at the top in terms of academic qualifications. by using very large racial p
. borrowing not to invest in schools, in hospitals, transport and education. but borrowing to keep people idle. so the next time you hear a conservative say to you labour would increase borrowing, just remember it is this government that is increasing borrowing this year. [applause] so what have we seen? we've seen recession, higher unemployment, higher borrowing. i don't think that's what people were promised. now look there will be some people who say, and this is an important argument, they'll be some people who say, well there is short-term pain but it is worth it for the long-term gain. but i'm afraid the opposite is true. you see that the longer you have low growth in our country the bigger the debt hole becomes for the future and the bigger our problems will be in the future. the longer a young person is out of work that is not just bad for their prospects now; it is bad for their prospects for the whole of the rest of their lives. and if a small business goes under during the recession, it can't just get back up and running again during the recovery. so when david cameron says to you,
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